The Social Media Beat

The Social Media Beat

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Negative Comments About Police Department on Twitter. What Can You Do About It?

By Billy Grogan

Billy Grogan

Billy Grogan is the Chief of Police for the Dunwoody Police Department in Georgia. Follow Chief Grogan on Twitter @ChiefGrogan.

Read Full Bio…

A lot has been written lately about how to moderate comments on Facebook and how important it is to have a well written Terms of Use for your Facebook page. Unfortunately, very little has been written about how to handle negative comments about your department on Twitter.  Twitter is obviously much different than Facebook. The main difference related to comments is comments are not posted on your page where you have control over them and have the ability to hide or delete them. Instead, when someone mentions your department on Twitter, you can see the comments but have no control over them.  How can you manage these negative comments if you have no control? Twitter has both a Terms of Service and Twitter Rules, which carefully defines acceptable content on Twitter. Twitter has a number of areas that may be applicable to comments posted on Twitter about your department. Violent threats, either direct or indirect, are a violation of the Terms of Use of Twitter. In addition, harassment is a viola ...

Read the rest of entry »

Monday, February 08, 2016

10,000 Characters for a Tweet?

By Guest Blogger

Guest Blogger

The Social Media Beat periodically features guest bloggers who share their perspective on the topic of social media and law enforcement.

Read Full Bio…

In January 2016, many tech media outlets began reporting that Twitter would be increasing their character limit for tweets from 140 characters to 10,000 characters (see this article from Re/code). While an official announcement from Twitter has yet to be made, the potential change is something about which law enforcement agencies should be giving some thought now. The 140-character limit has been Twitter’s unique hallmark since its inception; Twitter purists curse the very thought of a change, predicting that the conversion will be a failed attempt to make the platform “more Facebook-like” and that it will result in the loss of the short, live-update feel beloved by so many. All may not be lost for the Twitter traditionalists, however. As reported in the Wall Street Journal, a source with knowledge of the potential change has said that Twitter plans to retain the same “look and feel” of the timeline. Tweets that exceed 140 characters would require the user to click to expand to ...

Read the rest of entry »

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

The Social Leader...Good or Bad?

By Tim Burrows

Tim Burrows

Tim Burrows is a recently retired sergeant with 25 years of law enforcement experience.

Read Full Bio…

The leader of an agency be it the chief or the sheriff is in any other organization called a CEO. The Chief Executive Officer. The person in charge. The boss. The busiest person in the organization. It’s at the top where all the decisions that impact the entire organization are made. It is often where an organization is judged publicly. It is the position that no matter what, when bad things happen the boss is the person that wears it and in great organizations, that boss praises his or her people for the great work that is done, never seeking their own credit, glory, or acknowledgement. With the realities of today’s law enforcement executive, the challenges they face and the responsibility of their position, should we also expect them to be using social media platforms and engaging with the public in the digital space? How much serious work can be happening at the pinnacle of an organization if the person on the summit has time to tweet, post, like, and comment? Surely there are more pressing ...

Read the rest of entry »

Monday, January 11, 2016

Do You Speak Digital?

By Chris Hsiung

Chris Hsiung

Captain Chris Hsiung commands the Field Operations Division at the Mountain View Police Department in California. You can follow him on Twitter @chMtnViewPD.

Read Full Bio…

There's a new language sweeping the land. The younger generations speak it fluently. The masses are quickly adopting it. It sounds a lot like English but there are subtle nuances to it that are linked to pop culture and current events. Does your department speak it? Many of us serve diverse communities that speak a number of languages. In the last few years, a new "community” has emerged across the globe. That community is digital and although English may go a long way in reaching that audience, the dialect is "digital" and it's important that your department knows how to speak it. Social media tweets and posts will never replace face-to-face communication. Visual cues like body language, eye contact, and even voice inflection help provide contextual cues for our day-to-day "in person" communications. When you take those cues away, it can be easy to misunderstand texts, tweets, and posts. In addition, our industry is famous for speaking in a "just the facts" voice and tone online. Is it any surprise t ...

Read the rest of entry »

Monday, January 04, 2016

Facebook Update Focuses on “Engaging Posts”

By Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh is the Digital Communications Manager for the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office in Colorado. Follow Dionne on Twitter @JeffCoSheriffCo.

Read Full Bio…

Facebook often likes to change up how things look or how we post to the platform, but one recent change actually might help us with WHAT we post. I recently started seeing the phrase “Engaging Post” on our Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office timeline and started paying attention to when it showed up and how the posts differed from others. Here’s an example of what it looks like: When you hover over the little “I for Info” box with your mouse, this explainer comes up: The goal, apparently, is to help you post the most engaging content, which, honestly is what we’re all trying to do. I’ve seen this little icon pop up mostly on individual or a pair of photos that generated a lot of comments, specifically positive comments, like the ones above. I can also tell from looking at my Facebook analytics that they’re on the road to being able to tell us even more in-depth ways just how people feel about certain posts. Here’s another example. Check out the ...

Read the rest of entry »

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Spreading Cheer – and Safety – this Holiday Season

By Guest Blogger

Guest Blogger

The Social Media Beat periodically features guest bloggers who share their perspective on the topic of social media and law enforcement.

Read Full Bio…

Who doesn’t love the holidays in New York City? Rockefeller Center, ice skating in Central Park, Times Square...but for us at the NYPD, this time of year is also a busy season, as thousands of people flock to the city to enjoy the special holiday atmosphere. Public safety always comes first, and we have been using our 113 official NYPD Twitter accounts, Facebook page, and Instagram account to remind New Yorkers that although the city has never been safer, we are out there 24/7, so that they can enjoy their holidays. We’ve also learned that there are grinches that surface this time of year, so we are supplying our accounts with a few seasonal crime prevention tips. These include graphics warning New Yorkers about people stealing packages from lobbies and phony IRS debt collectors. This year also presented new challenges with some popular holiday gifts. Therefore, if you asked for an unmanned aerial system (drone) or hoverboard, you can expect to see cool GIFs from the NYPD about how to avoi ...

Read the rest of entry »

Friday, December 11, 2015

Twitter Tip: Photo Tagging

By Guest Blogger

Guest Blogger

The Social Media Beat periodically features guest bloggers who share their perspective on the topic of social media and law enforcement.

Read Full Bio…

Are you using Twitter’s “photo tagging” feature? If not, you should be. This post will tell you first what it is, then outline the many benefits it can bring to your agency, and finally, tell you how you do it. What does “photo tagging” look like? What does it do? Twitter allows up to ten accounts to be “tagged” in each tweet with photos. This is separate and distinct from a “mention” of an account in the text of the tweet itself. So, rather than using up your 140 characters to mention various Twitter accounts, you can save space and simply tag them in a photo. When a user is “tagged” in your tweet, they receive a notification. Here’s what a tweet with tags looks like; note that you can click on the “5 others” text and bring up the full list of all ten accounts: Why should you use photo tags? It’s often easy for a tweet to get overlooked in our timelines. Since Twitter sends a notification when ...

Read the rest of entry »

Monday, December 07, 2015

IACP 2015 Recap – The #LESM Perspective

By Dave Norris

Dave Norris

Dave Norris is a sergeant with San Mateo, California, Police Department.

Read Full Bio…

Who would have thought that this year members and affiliates of the IACP, representing some of the most senior and traditional members of the law enforcement community, would pepper the internet with hundreds of comments on social media, all bearing the hashtag #IACP2015? 2015 is the year… This is the year when law enforcement use of social media (#LESM) hit, merged, and became ingrained in the culture of our business. Granted, we had a series of heroic, violent, tragic, and also embarrassing events that entwined themselves in our culture to push us all to recognize the power social media holds over our image and integrity. Nevertheless – this fact is in the face of even our most staunchly traditional law enforcement professionals – social media IS here to stay, and it DOES matter to us, and to the survival of the law enforcement image we strive to preserve. Although my excuse for attending was the gracious invitation of my colleague and fellow blogger Dionne Waugh to talk about Law En ...

Read the rest of entry »

Thursday, December 03, 2015

Officer Elf on the Shelf Returns to Sarasota Police Department Headquarters

By Guest Blogger

Guest Blogger

The Social Media Beat periodically features guest bloggers who share their perspective on the topic of social media and law enforcement.

Read Full Bio…

For the second year in a row, Officer Elf on the Shelf has returned to provide backup to the Sarasota Police Department Officers in the City of Sarasota, Florida. So far in 2015, Officer Elf was spotted at the airport waiting to catch a flight from the North Pole, was sworn in by Chief Bernadette DiPino, and was caught riding shotgun with a Sarasota Police Officer. The idea for Officer Elf on the Shelf came up in December 2014 when I was brainstorming ideas to connect our community to our officers even more in a holiday way through our social media accounts. December is a very busy month for the men and women of the Sarasota Police Department with holiday parades, tree lightings, a boat parade along the Gulf of Mexico, and our annual Shop with a Cop, all which involve officers and our community. I wanted to not only have our community in Sarasota be part of all the holiday festivities but I also wanted our followers on social media to see that we have a sense of humor and we love this time as year just as ...

Read the rest of entry »

Tuesday, December 01, 2015

#IACP2015 Session Recap: Social Media Bootcamp

By Mark Economou

Mark Economou

Mark is the Public Information Officer for the Boca Raton Police Department in Boca Raton, Florida. Follow Mark on Twitter @BocaPolice.

Read Full Bio…

While just about every PIO session at this year’s IACP Conference and Exposition in Chicago had a nearly full audience and was jam packed with information, one session in particular hit it out of the park. Social Media Boot Camp with presenters Lieutenant Zach Perron from Palo Alto Police Department and Captain Chris Hsiung from Mountain View Police Department, packed the house with standing room only and left everyone wanting more. The two literally tag teamed the presentation, taking turns giving everyone the 101 on social media. To go through the entire presentation would take forever. So here are some of the key points. The session started off with Lieutenant Perron letting everyone know it’s an interactive session. He encouraged everyone to tweet about it, but to also tweet questions to them and they would answer them in between slides live! Lieutenant Perron also encouraged everyone to take a picture with one of the hundreds of Chicago Police Department officers helping keep the Conference ...

Read the rest of entry »

Text/HTML

About This Blog

So you have found, or perhaps stumbled upon, The Social Media Beat, the blog for the IACP Center for Social Media Web site. The Social Media Beat is about three things: social media, law enforcement, and perspective. Here you will find a fresh outlook on the issues that are affecting law enforcement agencies and their personnel when it comes to social media.

Social media is taking the world by storm. Social networks, blogs, photo and video sharing sites, and virtual communities are changing the way people live, work, and play. These tools present unique opportunities as well as challenges to the law enforcement community.  The Social Media Beat brings together a team of bloggers who will speak directly to you about hot topics and current issues.

Bloggers include IACP staff and practitioners in the field who can provide a unique front-line perspective. Our team cares about social media and wants to ensure that law enforcement across the country are knowledgeable and well-equipped to incorporate this technology.

Search this blog

Search

View Posts

By Date

By Author

By Tag

About the Authors

Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh is the Digital Communications Manager for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, which is the largest, full-service sheriff’s office in the state of Colorado. Prior to that, she spent more than six years creating and leading the Richmond, Virginia, Police Department’s social media efforts, which led to international acclaim and recognition.

She has spoken about law enforcement and social media at more than a dozen conferences across the country in addition to four IACP annual conferences. Waugh is a former newspaper reporter who wrote about crime, police, and the court system for several years. That experience and an ingrained curiosity for what makes people tick has fueled her desire to improve communication between people. Follow Dionne on Twitter @JeffCoSheriffCo.

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media serves as a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement personnel to develop or enhance their agency's use of social media and integrate Web 2.0 tools into agency operations. The Center is funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Leon Robertson

Officer Leon Robertson is the Social Media Coordinator for the Hampton Police Division. Robertson has developed internationally recognized public safety messages, including the Jingle Bells “Holiday Safety Remix” in December 2013. He has extensive experience in graphic design, video & audio production, and managing various social media platforms. You can follow Officer Robertson’s efforts with the Hampton Police Division on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Tracy Phillips

Tracy is a Senior Project Specialist with the IACP. She is responsible for managing the day-to-day operation of the DiscoverPolicing.org Web site and coordinating the site's social networking plan. In addition, Ms. Phillips provides writing, editorial, and technical assistance on a variety of association projects and activities, including police management studies, job analyses, executives searches, federal grants, and various research projects and proposals. She has more than 10 years of experience in state and local government, including work as a management analyst, performance auditor, and crime analyst. Ms. Phillips holds a master's degree in public administration from the University of Georgia and a bachelor's from Clemson University.

Want to hear more from Tracy Phillips? Follow her and the Discover Policing team on TwitterFacebook, and on the Inside Discover Policing blog. You can also network with other police recruitment professionals in the Law Enforcement Recruitment LinkedIn group.

Zach Perron

Lieutenant Zach Perron is the public affairs manager for the Palo Alto (CA) Police Department. Zach was a 2014 visiting fellow at the IACP in the Center for Social Media. He serves on the steering committee for the Bay Area Law Enforcement Social Media Group (BALESMG), and is a member of the US. Department of Homeland Security's Virtual Social Media Working Group (VSMWG). He holds a bachelor's degree in American Studies from Stanford University and is now pursuing a graduate education at the Naval Postgraduate School's Center for Homeland Defense and Security in Monterey, California.  You can follow him on Twitter: @zpPAPD.

Dave Norris

Sergeant Dave Norris is a 21 year veteran of the City of San Mateo Police Department. He has worked in a number of positions including Juvenile Detective, Field Training Officer, Narcotics Detective, and Patrol Supervisor. Dave is currently assigned to Community and Media Relations and oversees day-to-day functions that involve the relationship between the police, the community, and the media. Dave is dedicated to the increase of community engagement through the use of social media. Under his management, San Mateo PD's direct subscribers to community alerts and public safety messaging has grown from several hundred to over 22,000.

Chris Hsiung

Captain Chris Hsiung commands the Field Operations Division at the Mountain View Police Department in California. Through the department Community Action and Information Unit (CAIU), he manages strategy, community engagement, and growth through the police department social media channels. Chris has been serving the Mountain View community for over 19 years and has held a variety of assignments within MVPD. These include detective assignments in Property Crimes, Person Crimes, and High Tech Crimes as well as collateral assignments on SWAT and the Field Evidence Team. He also serves on the planning committee for the Bay Area Law Enforcement Social Media Group (BALESMG). You can follow him on Twitter @chMtnViewPD.

Lynn Hightower

Lynn is the Communications Director and Public Information Officer for the Boise Police Department and has served in that role since October, 2003. Lynn also serves at the PIO for the Boise Fire Department. Lynn authors and manages the social media outreach for Boise Police and often acts as media spokesperson. She advises officers from patrol to command staff on media and public communications skills. Lynn joined the Boise Police Department after 17 years as a television reporter, producer, anchor, and news director. Lynn regularly instructs new officers at the Boise Police Academy and has given media and public communications presentations to dozens of federal, state, and local emergency responder agencies. Follow Lynn and Boise Police on Twitter @BoisePD.

Billy Grogan

Billy Grogan is the Chief of Police for the Dunwoody Police Department in Georgia. Chief Grogan was hired on December 17, 2008, after serving 28 years with the Marietta, Georgia, Police Department, to start a brand new department. On April 1, 2009, the Dunwoody Police Department began operations with 40 sworn officers and eight civilians providing police services to the 47,000+ residents of the City of Dunwoody. Chief Grogan embraced the use of social media from day one of operations. The Dunwoody Police Department began using Twitter the first day and has added Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and Vine to their arsenal since then as effective tools to market their department and engage their community. Chief Grogan has written about the benefits of law enforcements use of social media, participated in several social media focus groups and lectured at the IACP, Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police Conference, COPS Conference, and many other venues. Follow Chief Grogan on Twitter @ChiefGrogan and the Dunwoody Police Department @DunwoodyPolice.

Mark Economou

Mark Economou is the Public Information Officer for the Boca Raton Police Department in Boca Raton, Florida. His media and public relations background spans nearly 20 years. Spending nearly 15 years in radio and television news, Economou held many positions from assignment editor, reporter, anchor, and executive editor. After that, he served as the Director of Media Relations for Cote & D'Ambrosio, a Public Relations, Marketing and Advertising firm in Wickford, RI. He then served as head of Media Relations for Citizens Bank of Rhode Island, the 9th largest bank in the United States. Follow Mark on Twitter @BocaPolice.

Frank Domizio

Corporal Frank Domizio has been with the Philadelphia Police Department since 1997. He is currently assigned to the FBI’s Regional Computer Forensics Lab as a Forensic Examiner. Previously he was assigned to the Department's Office of Media Relations and Public Affairs where he was the Social and Digital Media Manager. Frank has spoke at several industry conferences and major universities on the topics of social media and content strategy.

Tim Burrows

Tim Burrows was a sworn police officer for 25 years with experience in front line operations, primary response, traffic, detective operations, and supervision. He has training in a broad spectrum of policing responsibilities including IMS, Emergency Management, computer assisted technology investigations, leadership, community policing, and crisis communications. Tim left policing but has remained involved through consulting with law enforcement on the advancement of communications and social media. Tim runs #CopChat on Wednesday nights at 9pm ET, to allow police and community members to connect and break down barriers. To learn more about him you can follow him on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook or click here to contact him http://bit.ly/ContactTimBurrows

Guest Blogger

The Social Media Beat periodically features guest bloggers who share their perspective on the topic of social media and law enforcement. These individuals are law enforcement professionals; sworn and civilian personnel from agencies of all types and sizes throughout the world. If you are interested in guest blogging, please send your request to socialmedia@theiacp.org. All bloggers must be affiliated with a law enforcement agency or educational institution. We cannot accept blog entries from vendors or others working in a for-profit capacity.

Created by Matrix Group International, Inc.