The Social Media Beat

The Social Media Beat

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Addressing Online Radicalization to Violence

By IACP Center for Social Media

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media is a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement use social media.

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Today’s post is the seventh in the series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about the Addressing Online Radicalization to Violence session on Tuesday, October 22. As we have blogged about before here and here, social media is being used by violent extremists to connect, communicate, and engage. This Programs and Research Track workshop focused on needing to understand how and why extremists use social media to help radicalize individuals to violence and how law enforcement can leverage the same sites to counter these violent recruiters. John Markovic, Senior Social Science Analyst from the COPS Office, kicked off the workshop by highlighting the different projects, deliverables, and trainings related to community policing and countering violent extremism (CVE) that the COPS Office has funded. In particular, John noted the deliverables including issue briefs and webinars about online radicalization to violence and how extremists are using specific social medi ...

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Tuesday, November 12, 2013

The 411 on Social Media: Tools and Tactics for Successful Conversations

By Tracy Phillips

Tracy Phillips

Tracy, an IACP Senior Project Specialist, is responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of IACP's recruitment initiative, Discover Policing.

Want to hear more from Tracy Phillips? Follow her and the Discover Policing team on Twitter, Facebook, and on the Inside Discover Policing blog.

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Today’s post is the sixth in a series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about the 411 on Social Media: Tools and Tactics for Successful Conversations session on Saturday, October 19. This session was led by a pair of law enforcement social media rock stars: Lieutenant Christopher Cook and Officer Zhivonni McDonnell of the Arlington, Texas, Police Department. Arlington was awarded the "Most Innovative Use of Social Media" by the Center for Digital Government in 2012, so attendees were learning from the best. This workshop was geared for PIOs and executive staff on how to create a social media program from existing resources and offered a wealth of great information on maximizing social media as a community engagement tool. Lieutenant Cook and Officer McDonnell provided insight on the benefits of social media for law enforcement, tips for getting started, and strategies for success in a variety of platforms.   Benefits to law enforcement taking advantag ...

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Friday, November 08, 2013

Advice from Chiefs Who Use Social Media

By Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh is a member of the Richmond Police Department's Public Affairs Unit in Richmond, Virginia. Follow Dionne on Twitter @RichmondPolice.

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Today’s post is the fifth in a series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about the Chiefs Who Tweet (or Pin, or Post) workshop on Tuesday, October 22. For Kansas City, Missouri, Police Chief Darryl Forte and Boca Raton, Florida, Police Chief Dan Alexander, it’s a no brainer: police chiefs need to be out there using social media to communicate with the public. “It reaps so many benefits,” Chief Forte said during the IACP conference session. “It’s like going to a City Council or a budget meeting. You’ve got to do it. Not necessarily every day, just when you have something to say.” Chief Forte tweets from his own Twitter account @ChiefForte and posts to a chief’s blog while Chief Alexander tweets from @BocaChief and posts on the Boca Chief’s official Facebook page. Though both may have needed a little technological help from their staff to get their accounts set up initially, they now run them all by t ...

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Wednesday, November 06, 2013

The Boston Terrorist Attack and the Use of Social Media

By Billy Grogan

Billy Grogan

Billy Grogan is the Chief of Police for the Dunwoody Police Department in Georgia. Follow Chief Grogan on Twitter @ChiefGrogan.

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Today’s post is the fourth in a series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about the Case Study – Boston: Leading Social Media in Crisis session on Monday, October 21. In light of the Boston Marathon bombing, attendees of the 2013 IACP Conference were looking forward to the insights offered by the panelists about how the use of social media benefited law enforcement’s response to the crisis.   The panelists began their presentation with a very moving video of the timeline of the bombing from the moment it happened to the capture of the suspect.  Intermingled in the video were examples of postings from social media from citizens as well as the police. Cheryl Fiandaca, Bureau Chief, Public Information for the Boston Police Department described her initial response to the bombing and how she managed her team throughout the crisis.  The Boston Police Commissioner directed her to provide as much information as possible through social m ...

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Monday, November 04, 2013

Messaging and Relationships

By IACP Center for Social Media

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media is a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement use social media.

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Today’s post is the third in a series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about The Formula of Messaging, the Skill of Relationships workshop on October 19. This workshop kicked off the Public Information Officers Track at IACP 2013. The content and key themes addressed during this workshop crossed over all communications tools, including, but not limited to, social media. The first panelist, Sergeant Dave Norris of the San Mateo, California, Police Department, discussed how to create meaningful messages and the role of the PIO in today’s law enforcement agency.  Dave described how the PIO plays a critical role in communicating directly with the public AND traditional media outlets. Because of this, the PIO role needs to be tightly integrated with the agency’s social media function because everything an agency posts, regardless of the medium, is a press release. Further, traditional media outlets are constantly searching social media for content, ...

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Thursday, October 31, 2013

Taking Your Message to the Next Level

By Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh is a member of the Richmond Police Department's Public Affairs Unit in Richmond, Virginia. Follow Dionne on Twitter @RichmondPolice.

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Today’s post is the second in a series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about the Taking Your Message to the Next Level: Advanced Social Media session on Sunday, October 20. Boise, Idaho; Boca Raton, Florida; and Seattle, Washington. These are three very different parts of the country with three very different types of crime, demographics, and police departments and yet they all use different social media platforms with the same goals: to educate, communicate, and interact with their communities. Though their session at the IACP 2013 conference was titled “Taking Your Message to the Next Level: Advanced Social Media,” I think any agency at any level can use these tips. Boise Police Communications Director Lynn Hightower mentioned three different types of social media tools and explained how they could benefit an agency: 1-Twitter alerts. The IACP has written a more detailed post on these, but Lynn explained that every agency should sig ...

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Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Using Social Media as an Investigative Tool

By IACP Center for Social Media

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media is a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement use social media.

Read Full Bio…

Today’s post is the first in a series of blog posts highlighting IACP 2013 social media workshops. This post is about the Using Social Media as an Investigative Tool session on Sunday, October 20. This Chief Executive Track workshop, kicked off with some highlights from IACP’s fourth annual social media survey including that 86.1% of law enforcement agencies use social media for investigative purposes and 80.4% of agencies state that social media has helped solve crime in their jurisdiction. Director Vernon Keenan of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation discussed the use of technology in law enforcement today and the nexus between privacy and technology in today’s society. Director Keenan acknowledged that there hasn’t been a lot of focus on what law enforcement should and shouldn’t be doing and that case law pertaining to the role of social media in investigations is still emerging. This gap demonstrates that it is imperative that law enforcement executives conduct their activi ...

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Thursday, October 24, 2013

Giving Your Community What They Want vs. What They Need

By Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh is a member of the Richmond Police Department's Public Affairs Unit in Richmond, Virginia. Follow Dionne on Twitter @RichmondPolice.

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It’s an age-old question: Do you give the people want they want to see or what they need to know?And it’s the question several of us who run our police agency’s social media sites also ponder. Do we post information about crimes, which are usually scary, unsettling, and bad for the image of the community, but good for the community to know and helpful for us to generate tips and arrests? Do we post wanted posters that, if Facebook analytics are accurate, generate very little interest, or do we post cute photos of our K9 and Mounted Units that go a long way in generating new Facebook likes and many positive impressions about what our officers do?The answer lies somewhere in between finding the right balance of content that satisfies your department’s needs and goals and what the community finds most interesting.In Richmond, we have found that our “most popular” postings are usually those that are about the positive things are officers are doing in the community. That would be the photos of officers at communit ...

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Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Social Media is Going to the Dogs

By IACP Center for Social Media

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media is a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement use social media.

Read Full Bio…

There are a lot of different ways to be successful on social media. One of the few universal rules of social media is that people love, love, love pictures of animals. Ask most agencies about their most popular social media posts and they usually involve a picture of a furry friend. Some agencies are taking this a step further... Allowing their K9s to have their very own social media accounts. Here are the K9s we follow and what they have to say: @BPDK9Bushido of the Boston Police Department conversing with BPD Superintendent Ed Davis: @K9Ares of the San Rafael Police Department (K9 Faro also tweets!): @PPDK9Thor of the Philadelphia Police Department: Any other K9s tweeting? Let us know so we can follow them!

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Friday, October 18, 2013

IACP 2013 Social Media Survey Results

By IACP Center for Social Media

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media is a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement use social media.

Read Full Bio…

This fall, the IACP conducted its fourth annual social media survey. This year’s survey included 500 agencies representing 48 states. The survey helps to identify trends, challenges, and emerging issues faced by state, tribal, campus, and local law enforcement leaders in the United States.  The information collected is used to help inform the IACP’s Center for Social Media and other IACP efforts. The survey results have been referenced in dozens of news articles and research papers from around the world. We have observed tremendous growth in the use of social media over the last year. As in previous years, the most popular social media activity is criminal investigations:   Some other survey highlights:   •    The most frequently used social media platforms are Facebook (92.1%),        Twitter (64.8%), and YouTube (42.9%). •    57.1% of agencies not currently using social media are considering its   &nb ...

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About This Blog

So you have found, or perhaps stumbled upon, The Social Media Beat, the blog for the IACP Center for Social Media Web site. The Social Media Beat is about three things: social media, law enforcement, and perspective. Here you will find a fresh outlook on the issues that are affecting law enforcement agencies and their personnel when it comes to social media.

Social media is taking the world by storm. Social networks, blogs, photo and video sharing sites, and virtual communities are changing the way people live, work, and play. These tools present unique opportunities as well as challenges to the law enforcement community.  The Social Media Beat brings together a team of bloggers who will speak directly to you about hot topics and current issues.

Bloggers include IACP staff and practitioners in the field who can provide a unique front-line perspective. Our team cares about social media and wants to ensure that law enforcement across the country are knowledgeable and well-equipped to incorporate this technology.

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About the Authors

Dionne Waugh

Dionne Waugh is the social media guru for the Richmond Police Department. As a member of the Department's Public Affairs Unit since September 2008, she created and developed the agency's successful use of social media and continues to try and find new ways to improve the way Richmond Police communicate online. She has spoken about law enforcement and social media at more than a dozen conferences across the country in addition to the past four IACP annual conferences. Waugh is a former newspaper reporter who wrote about crime, police, and the court system for six years. That experience and an ingrained curiosity for what makes people tick has fueled her desire to improve communication between people. Follow Dionne on Twitter @RichmondPolice.

IACP Center for Social Media

IACP's Center for Social Media serves as a clearinghouse of information and no-cost resources to help law enforcement personnel to develop or enhance their agency's use of social media and integrate Web 2.0 tools into agency operations. The Center is funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Tracy Phillips

Tracy is a Senior Project Specialist with the IACP. She is responsible for managing the day-to-day operation of the DiscoverPolicing.org Web site and coordinating the site's social networking plan. In addition, Ms. Phillips provides writing, editorial, and technical assistance on a variety of association projects and activities, including police management studies, job analyses, executives searches, federal grants, and various research projects and proposals. She has more than 10 years of experience in state and local government, including work as a management analyst, performance auditor, and crime analyst. Ms. Phillips holds a master's degree in public administration from the University of Georgia and a bachelor's from Clemson University.

Want to hear more from Tracy Phillips? Follow her and the Discover Policing team on TwitterFacebook, and on the Inside Discover Policing blog. You can also network with other police recruitment professionals in the Law Enforcement Recruitment LinkedIn group.

Dave Norris

Sergeant Dave Norris is a 21 year veteran of the City of San Mateo Police Department. He has worked in a number of positions including Juvenile Detective, Field Training Officer, Narcotics Detective, and Patrol Supervisor. Dave is currently assigned to Community and Media Relations and oversees day-to-day functions that involve the relationship between the police, the community, and the media. Dave is dedicated to the increase of community engagement through the use of social media. Under his management, San Mateo PD's direct subscribers to community alerts and public safety messaging has grown from several hundred to over 22,000.

Chris Hsiung

Captain Chris Hsiung commands the Field Operations Division at the Mountain View Police Department in California. Through the department Community Action and Information Unit (CAIU), he manages strategy, community engagement, and growth through the police department social media channels. Chris has been serving the Mountain View community for over 19 years and has held a variety of assignments within MVPD. These include detective assignments in Property Crimes, Person Crimes, and High Tech Crimes as well as collateral assignments on SWAT and the Field Evidence Team. He also serves on the planning committee for the Bay Area Law Enforcement Social Media Group (BALESMG). You can follow him on Twitter @chMtnViewPD.

Lynn Hightower

Lynn is the Communications Director and Public Information Officer for the Boise Police Department and has served in that role since October, 2003. Lynn also serves at the PIO for the Boise Fire Department. Lynn authors and manages the social media outreach for Boise Police and often acts as media spokesperson. She advises officers from patrol to command staff on media and public communications skills. Lynn joined the Boise Police Department after 17 years as a television reporter, producer, anchor, and news director. Lynn regularly instructs new officers at the Boise Police Academy and has given media and public communications presentations to dozens of federal, state, and local emergency responder agencies. Follow Lynn and Boise Police on Twitter @BoisePD.

Billy Grogan

Billy Grogan is the Chief of Police for the Dunwoody Police Department in Georgia. Chief Grogan was hired on December 17, 2008, after serving 28 years with the Marietta, Georgia, Police Department, to start a brand new department. On April 1, 2009, the Dunwoody Police Department began operations with 40 sworn officers and eight civilians providing police services to the 47,000+ residents of the City of Dunwoody. Chief Grogan embraced the use of social media from day one of operations. The Dunwoody Police Department began using Twitter the first day and has added Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and Vine to their arsenal since then as effective tools to market their department and engage their community. Chief Grogan has written about the benefits of law enforcements use of social media, participated in several social media focus groups and lectured at the IACP, Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police Conference, COPS Conference, and many other venues. Follow Chief Grogan on Twitter @ChiefGrogan and the Dunwoody Police Department @DunwoodyPolice.

Mark Economou

Mark Economou is the Public Information Officer for the Boca Raton Police Department in Boca Raton, Florida. His media and public relations background spans nearly 20 years. Spending nearly 15 years in radio and television news, Economou held many positions from assignment editor, reporter, anchor, and executive editor. After that, he served as the Director of Media Relations for Cote & D'Ambrosio, a Public Relations, Marketing and Advertising firm in Wickford, RI. He then served as head of Media Relations for Citizens Bank of Rhode Island, the 9th largest bank in the United States. Follow Mark on Twitter @BocaPolice.

Frank Domizio

Corporal Frank Domizio has been with the Philadelphia Police Department since 1997. He is currently assigned to the FBI’s Regional Computer Forensics Lab as a Forensic Examiner. Previously he was assigned to the Department's Office of Media Relations and Public Affairs where he was the Social and Digital Media Manager. Frank has spoke at several industry conferences and major universities on the topics of social media and content strategy.

Tim Burrows

Tim Burrows is a Sergeant with the Toronto Police - Traffic Services Unit. His primary role is the supervisor for strategic communications and media relations related to traffic issues within the geographical boundaries of Toronto. Tim was appointed to the Traffic Services Communications Office in 2008 with the mandate to raise the profile of traffic issues within the mindset of the general public. In an effort to enhance traffic safety and to control the timing and full scope of messaging, he has developed a targeted information stream using social media to expand the Toronto Police Service span of influence within the Toronto community and beyond with the goal of reducing collisions, injury, and death in Toronto. Using Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Blogs, Tim has pushed information about traffic safety to the citizens of Toronto and has opened the lines of communication to allow for collaborative efforts with community groups, road users, and individuals.

Guest Blogger

The Social Media Beat periodically features guest bloggers who share their perspective on the topic of social media and law enforcement. These individuals are law enforcement professionals; sworn and civilian personnel from agencies of all types and sizes throughout the world. If you are interested in guest blogging, please send your request to socialmedia@theiacp.org. All bloggers must be affiliated with a law enforcement agency or educational institution. We cannot accept blog entries from vendors or others working in a for-profit capacity.

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